Category Archives: Music

The Psychology of Music second edition edited by Diana Deutsch

This book is a comprehensive introduction to the field of music psychology. It’s also designed so that you read only the chapters that have topics you are most interested in (for example, neural networks). This book is absolutely a must-read if you are in the field or trying to enter it, or are extremely interested in the topic. If you want some light reading that gives an introduction, this is not it. All of the chapters are written by top individuals in the field and they are all very scientific. This is a bit like reading many scientific papers on a topic, so it can be exhausting.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Music, Nonfiction, Psychology, Science

The Mastery of Music: Ten Pathways to True Artistry by Barry Green

This book is all about the characteristics that musicians need in order to succeed (since the author is a professional double bass player, he knows what he’s talking about), told from the perspective of the musicians that the author feels most embody these characteristics (for example, CONFIDENCE: From Bravura to Integrity is discussed with trumpet players). I couldn’t put this book down. He talked to some of the top musicians in the world, and they told us stories that make them seem just like all of us amateur musicians (except more skilled of course). I was so motivated by the suggestions they made that I practiced much more carefully for the next several weeks. I am now so much better prepared for the group I’m playing in this weekend because of these improvements I made! Any musician can learn something from this book. Even if you aren’t a musician, there is something for you! Mr. Green spends some time in each chapter discussing how to extend these characteristics into the rest of your life, something applicable to everyone!

Leave a comment

Filed under Music, Nonfiction

The Power of Music: Pioneering Discoveries in the New Science of Song by Elena Mannes

I’m very interested in music cognition, so this seemed like a great book to start out with. It was an easy read that was enjoyable, but at times it was preachy about the wonderfulness of music, which got a bit tiring. It also didn’t talk about the psychology of music nearly as much as I expected. If you’re interested in how musicians think about music, and the power that music can have, this is a great book. If you’re interested in the science of music, try something else.

Leave a comment

Filed under Music, Nonfiction, Psychology, Science